NYC Diaries, 26. Mai 2014: Vergilia’s Rules on Eating and Making Friends

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NYC Diaries, 26. Mai 2014: Vergilia’s Rules on Eating and Making Friends

One thing is for sure in New York City: You won’t go hungry. Somebody recently did the math: If you were to eat in a different restaurant everyday, it would take you more than 22 years to visit all restaurants of New York City. You find restaurants for any taste, serving any cuisine known to man (though a friend of mine complained that it seems to be impossible to find a good Italian place) and catering to the needs of whatever diet may be en vogue. Almost every restaurant has its selection of vegetarian, vegan, low-carb or gluten-free dishes. And then there are food carts, bodegas (worth another article), delis, supermarkets literally everywhere. And if you really find yourself in a foodfree zone, you may just wait for 20 minutes at the next corner: Chances are, a new place will open in the meantime.

On a side note: You may also lose some weight, while you are here – remember all the walking.

So: How to pick the right place to eat. The Digital Natives will, of course, turn to Yelp (or other apps) to find a place. In my experience, the recoomendations there are kind of trustworthy but might be outdated. So look for the newest comments to get a good picture.

Yet, I also talked to my trusty guide Vergilia about it. And, of course, she also had some easy-to-remember rules.

Vergilia’s Rule #2: If you want to make instant friends, find somebody who is clearly local (e.g. somebody sitting on the stairs to his or her house) and ask him/her: „What’s good to eat around here?“

New Yorkers are not only into food and can discuss nutritional value as well as restaurant quality for hours (always a good topic if you want to avoid arguing politics or talk about the weather … again), their are patriotic about their city, and, especially about their neighborhood. Giving a stranger directions makes them proud. And talking about their favorite place to eat will make your mouth water. On top of that, you’ll make a new friend.

Vergilia’s Rule #3: You can spot the good food carts by the amount of grease stains on the asphalt around them

You will be tempted once in a while to have some food from a food cart. They are everywhere. Some serve Halal food (recommendable because of its strict rules on preparation and hygiene), other Mexican or the good old Hot Dog. Some even specialize in salad and fruit, others in burgers and fries. Yet, it isn’t always easy to spot the good ones. So, Vergilia’s Rule #3 comes in really handy. In a fast-paced, highly competitive city like New York, only the places with good quality and service succeed. So, if there are a lot of grease stains around the cart, it has been there for a longer time … meaning, it has succeeded. As simple as that.

Personal Recommendation:

In case you ever find yourself in my current neighbourhood Bushwick and hanker for a salad, you may want to try Greenstreet Salads. This decidedly unpretentious little cornershop serves great soups and salads. You may even compose your own salad, if nothing on the menu is to your liking. It’s fast and good and healthy, though nothing to invite your date to, unless you want to see a show at the Bushwick Starr, a little performance space close by or have an evening indulging in beer at The Sampler, which is also close by.

Von | 2017-08-01T14:15:50+00:00 Juni 15th, 2017|Englisch, Leben, New York City|Kommentare deaktiviert für NYC Diaries, 26. Mai 2014: Vergilia’s Rules on Eating and Making Friends

About the Author:

Helmut Barz
ist kein höheres Wesen, würde jedoch – nach seinem Ableben vor die Wahl gestellt – eine Existenz als Gespenst in Erwägung ziehen, vorzugsweise als Hausgeist der Deutschen Bibliothek. Eine Wiedergeburt als Panda wäre aber auch in Ordnung. Geboren in Braunschweig, wuchs er in St. Peter-Ording an der Nordseeküste auf. Nach dem Abitur und zwei Jahren Arbeit an verschiedenen Berliner Theatern studierte er Theaterwissenschaften in Gießen sowie Theaterregie in Frankfurt am Main. Hauptberuflich arbeitet er derzeit als freiberuflicher Kreativdirektor, Texter, PR-Consultant, Übersetzer und Regisseur: Er inszenierte unter anderem in Celle, Stuttgart, Frankfurt und Kapstadt. Seine schriftstellerische Leidenschaft gehört dem fiktionalen Schreiben: Er hat bis jetzt fünf Romane veröffentlicht, darunter die Krimiserie um die Frankfurter Kriminalpolizistin Katharina Klein. Seine (oft musikalisch untermalten) Lesungen haben im Rhein-Main-Gebiet eine treue Fangemeinde. Zurzeit lebt er in Offenbach am Main, hat jedoch auch viel Zeit in Kapstadt und New York verbracht.